Feb 10, 2010

5 Steps to reduce your Carbon Footprint today [Green]

Let my voice be heard. Let my impact be felt. Let me do something that can make a difference today.

A few days back, I wrote a post which introduced the concept of “Supply to Zero”. Although seemingly impossible at this point in time, the idea (inspired by Bill Gates’ recent talk at TED), is about how we can reduce the amount of CO2 that is produced as a result of the various activities that make up Supply Chain Management.

 

The Carbon Footprint is a much talked about metric in today’s world. After Copenhagen and Doha, I’ve been seeing that a lot has been written about this term. It seems more companies are interested in adopting this metric sometime in the near future and use it for reporting purposes – especially with the risk that a similar metric is going to become mandatory in the near future. There is a “State of Green Business” forum going on as I write this blog post. The world is finally waking up to the fact that we need to get “Green” into the picture and make sure that we have a reporting mechanism in place to measure improvement. I have a video below, which highlights this exact idea. This video takes a look at individual, collective and corporate levels of responsibility we need to take up for our environmental challenges.

This video accompanies a presentation entitled: "Being Honest With Ourselves: Putting Numbers Behind Green Business”. You can download a copy of the presentation here.

 national_carbon_dioxide_co2_emissions_per_capita

But the real question that arises from all this is “Can you really measure your Carbon Footprint?”  The average footprint for a person in North America is 20 Tons of CO2 every year. The average for the entire world is about 4 Tons of CO2 every year (Imagine the amount by which the rest of the world offsets the footprint of North America). Just look at the graph here to get an idea.

 

So back to the question we were trying to answer. Can you end up reducing it or eliminating it completely? Turns out you can. I’ll give you five ways you can reduce your Carbon Footprint today. If climate change is really a concern for you and you want to do your bit, you’ll do it today. Something like turning water off when not in use goes a long way.

 

  1. Turn down the water heating setting to 130 F along with turning down the central heating slightly (try just 3 degrees reduces 1100 pounds annually).
  2. Check the central heating timer setting - remember there is no point heating the house after you have left for work.
  3. Turn off lights when not in use. Replace 75 watt bulbs with Compact Fluorescent lamps.
  4. Inflate your car tires regularly (can save 400-700 pounds of CO2 annually).
  5. Install CFC free air conditioners. (Energy Star Products are certified to have low CO2 emissions). Get cavity wall installation done. Savings are up to $350 per month. Cost can be recovered in 5 years. Turn off the air conditioner when you’re out.

    It’s as simple as this. Five small steps today are a potential starting point. Also, I’ve listed a few resources below. Most of these sources will help you calculate your personal Carbon Footprint and tell you how you can reduce it immediately with just minor changes to your lifestyle.

    Let my voice be heard. Let my impact be felt. Let me do something that can make a difference today.

    Resources:

What do you think? Is the Carbon Footprint something you’re worried about? Will you follow these steps? Write to me in the comments section and let me know.

Feb 10, 2010

5 Steps to reduce your Carbon Footprint today [Green]

Let my voice be heard. Let my impact be felt. Let me do something that can make a difference today.

A few days back, I wrote a post which introduced the concept of “Supply to Zero”. Although seemingly impossible at this point in time, the idea (inspired by Bill Gates’ recent talk at TED), is about how we can reduce the amount of CO2 that is produced as a result of the various activities that make up Supply Chain Management.

 

The Carbon Footprint is a much talked about metric in today’s world. After Copenhagen and Doha, I’ve been seeing that a lot has been written about this term. It seems more companies are interested in adopting this metric sometime in the near future and use it for reporting purposes – especially with the risk that a similar metric is going to become mandatory in the near future. There is a “State of Green Business” forum going on as I write this blog post. The world is finally waking up to the fact that we need to get “Green” into the picture and make sure that we have a reporting mechanism in place to measure improvement. I have a video below, which highlights this exact idea. This video takes a look at individual, collective and corporate levels of responsibility we need to take up for our environmental challenges.

This video accompanies a presentation entitled: "Being Honest With Ourselves: Putting Numbers Behind Green Business”. You can download a copy of the presentation here.

 national_carbon_dioxide_co2_emissions_per_capita

But the real question that arises from all this is “Can you really measure your Carbon Footprint?”  The average footprint for a person in North America is 20 Tons of CO2 every year. The average for the entire world is about 4 Tons of CO2 every year (Imagine the amount by which the rest of the world offsets the footprint of North America). Just look at the graph here to get an idea.

 

So back to the question we were trying to answer. Can you end up reducing it or eliminating it completely? Turns out you can. I’ll give you five ways you can reduce your Carbon Footprint today. If climate change is really a concern for you and you want to do your bit, you’ll do it today. Something like turning water off when not in use goes a long way.

 

  1. Turn down the water heating setting to 130 F along with turning down the central heating slightly (try just 3 degrees reduces 1100 pounds annually).
  2. Check the central heating timer setting - remember there is no point heating the house after you have left for work.
  3. Turn off lights when not in use. Replace 75 watt bulbs with Compact Fluorescent lamps.
  4. Inflate your car tires regularly (can save 400-700 pounds of CO2 annually).
  5. Install CFC free air conditioners. (Energy Star Products are certified to have low CO2 emissions). Get cavity wall installation done. Savings are up to $350 per month. Cost can be recovered in 5 years. Turn off the air conditioner when you’re out.

    It’s as simple as this. Five small steps today are a potential starting point. Also, I’ve listed a few resources below. Most of these sources will help you calculate your personal Carbon Footprint and tell you how you can reduce it immediately with just minor changes to your lifestyle.

    Let my voice be heard. Let my impact be felt. Let me do something that can make a difference today.

    Resources:

What do you think? Is the Carbon Footprint something you’re worried about? Will you follow these steps? Write to me in the comments section and let me know.