Dec 13, 2009

The US logistics battle

 

Looks like the Wall Street Journal is keeping a tab on how the US military is dealing with its logistics supplies in Afghanistan. Here’s part of it. Hit the jump to read the rest of the article.

Another pressure: Senior Democratic and Republican lawmakers are chafing at the high cost of operations in Afghanistan.Army Logistics

"As you transition operations to Afghanistan, you find that the cost of doing business is two to three times as expensive as Iraq," said Dakota Wood, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments in Washington. According to the think tank, the annual cost of a U.S. soldier is about $1 million in Afghanistan, with fuel costs associated with supporting that soldier accounting for between $200,000 to $350,000 of the total.

Mr. Gates's latest push to protect U.S. forces from roadside bombs in Afghanistan has sent parts of the defense industry into overdrive and presented Mr. Carter with one of his biggest challenges.

Oshkosh is racing to churn out 1,000 blast-resistant trucks a month. The trucks will protect against low-tech but very powerful improvised explosive devices, one of the biggest killers of U.S. forces.

"What limits the rate at which they'll get to the troops is not the factory in Oshkosh and how  fast it can produce vehicles. It's how quickly can we introduce them into this faraway place," Mr. Carter said.

Source: Wall Street Journal Article

Dec 13, 2009

The US logistics battle

 

Looks like the Wall Street Journal is keeping a tab on how the US military is dealing with its logistics supplies in Afghanistan. Here’s part of it. Hit the jump to read the rest of the article.

Another pressure: Senior Democratic and Republican lawmakers are chafing at the high cost of operations in Afghanistan.Army Logistics

"As you transition operations to Afghanistan, you find that the cost of doing business is two to three times as expensive as Iraq," said Dakota Wood, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments in Washington. According to the think tank, the annual cost of a U.S. soldier is about $1 million in Afghanistan, with fuel costs associated with supporting that soldier accounting for between $200,000 to $350,000 of the total.

Mr. Gates's latest push to protect U.S. forces from roadside bombs in Afghanistan has sent parts of the defense industry into overdrive and presented Mr. Carter with one of his biggest challenges.

Oshkosh is racing to churn out 1,000 blast-resistant trucks a month. The trucks will protect against low-tech but very powerful improvised explosive devices, one of the biggest killers of U.S. forces.

"What limits the rate at which they'll get to the troops is not the factory in Oshkosh and how  fast it can produce vehicles. It's how quickly can we introduce them into this faraway place," Mr. Carter said.

Source: Wall Street Journal Article