Dec 6, 2009

Not so SHARP…

 

A few osamsung-sharp-narniaf the week’s top headlines were about a certain form of market control in the electronics industry. Market control by price fixing. Exactly… now you know how I got the title!! Lets first get the news out of the way.

 

Firstly this.

Mobile handset maker Nokia Corp. (NOK) is suing 11 companies and a number of their units in the U.S., including AU Optronics Corp. (AUO), Chunghwa Picture Tubes Ltd. (2475.TW), Samsung Electronics Co. (005930.SE), Sharp Corp. (6753.TO), and LG Display Co. (LPL), alleging they colluded to fix prices on displays.

The complaint comes a year after the U.S. Department of Justice fined several liquid-crystal-display makers for price fixing. Sharp, Chunghwa, and LG Display agreed to plead guilty to price fixing at the time and paid fines. Samsung, the world's largest LCD maker, wasn't cited in the department's decision but it cooperated with U.S. investigators in the probe, people close to the case said. The probe into the LCD industry became public in 2006.

Source: Wall Street Journal Article

That was about the time that I had (unwittingly) written a piece on Nokia and their supply chain strategy too. And then, immediately after… this.

On Dec. 1, Samsung Electronics sued Sharp Electronics Corp. for infringing its patents related to liquid crystal display devices used in televisions. Fish & Richardson partner Ruffin Cordell filed the suit.

Source: Legaltimes Blog

and this…

Samsung on Dec. 2 also sued Sharp in federal court in Wilmington, Del. over the same patents. Typically, federal court cases are stayed pending a determination from the ITC. The ITC can ban the import of infringing products, while federal courts can award cash damages for past infringement.

Source: Legaltimes Blog

and this…

Also on Dec. 1, semiconductor maker Analog Devices Inc. filed suit at the ITC against Knowles Electronics of Itasca, Ill. and Mouser Electronics of Mansfield, Texas over surface mount MEMS microphones and products.

Source: Legaltimes Blog

And that’s why it was a hectic week in the world of electronics. Nofist-fight-t8831w I’m not running a legal blog – so  the only thing that would have brought me to cover this story would have been a fistfight. At least for now, that doesn’t seem to be happening so I’ll settle for the second best topic in my book – a case study of the supply chain practices of electronics manufacturers – mostly starting with Sharp because they have been doing a lot with their supply chain.

Now I can promise that the title of the post won’t be as long or boring as what I just typed. But look for the post sometime during this week. And in the meanwhile, lets enjoy the fistfight.

Dec 6, 2009

Not so SHARP…

 

A few osamsung-sharp-narniaf the week’s top headlines were about a certain form of market control in the electronics industry. Market control by price fixing. Exactly… now you know how I got the title!! Lets first get the news out of the way.

 

Firstly this.

Mobile handset maker Nokia Corp. (NOK) is suing 11 companies and a number of their units in the U.S., including AU Optronics Corp. (AUO), Chunghwa Picture Tubes Ltd. (2475.TW), Samsung Electronics Co. (005930.SE), Sharp Corp. (6753.TO), and LG Display Co. (LPL), alleging they colluded to fix prices on displays.

The complaint comes a year after the U.S. Department of Justice fined several liquid-crystal-display makers for price fixing. Sharp, Chunghwa, and LG Display agreed to plead guilty to price fixing at the time and paid fines. Samsung, the world's largest LCD maker, wasn't cited in the department's decision but it cooperated with U.S. investigators in the probe, people close to the case said. The probe into the LCD industry became public in 2006.

Source: Wall Street Journal Article

That was about the time that I had (unwittingly) written a piece on Nokia and their supply chain strategy too. And then, immediately after… this.

On Dec. 1, Samsung Electronics sued Sharp Electronics Corp. for infringing its patents related to liquid crystal display devices used in televisions. Fish & Richardson partner Ruffin Cordell filed the suit.

Source: Legaltimes Blog

and this…

Samsung on Dec. 2 also sued Sharp in federal court in Wilmington, Del. over the same patents. Typically, federal court cases are stayed pending a determination from the ITC. The ITC can ban the import of infringing products, while federal courts can award cash damages for past infringement.

Source: Legaltimes Blog

and this…

Also on Dec. 1, semiconductor maker Analog Devices Inc. filed suit at the ITC against Knowles Electronics of Itasca, Ill. and Mouser Electronics of Mansfield, Texas over surface mount MEMS microphones and products.

Source: Legaltimes Blog

And that’s why it was a hectic week in the world of electronics. Nofist-fight-t8831w I’m not running a legal blog – so  the only thing that would have brought me to cover this story would have been a fistfight. At least for now, that doesn’t seem to be happening so I’ll settle for the second best topic in my book – a case study of the supply chain practices of electronics manufacturers – mostly starting with Sharp because they have been doing a lot with their supply chain.

Now I can promise that the title of the post won’t be as long or boring as what I just typed. But look for the post sometime during this week. And in the meanwhile, lets enjoy the fistfight.